Tag Archives: Andersonville

The insane asylum next door

In a letter to my great-grandmother in about 1941, her sister, Emma Davies Sharp Smith, sketched her memories of their childhood home in Columbus, Ohio, where they lived on Marion Street: It was a dead end st. at both ends … Continue reading

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An Andersonville Anniversary

It was 150 years ago this month—February 24, 1864, to be exact—that Andersonville Prison first took in captured Union soldiers. Over the next 14 months, 12,699 men died there, close to one-third of the prisoners to pass through its gates. … Continue reading

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A Survivor of Andersonville and the Sultana

William Davies’ 1864 diary opens with a list of 19 men from Company A who have given him their photographs. At Andersonville National Historic Site (see recent posts about Davies‘ stay in the Confederate prison), there is a POW museum … Continue reading

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“Can this be Hell?”

The diary of Connecticut POW Robert Kellogg indicates that it was raining the day my great-great-grandfather, William Davies, arrived at Andersonville Prison. Kellogg had already been there for a month, enduring the Georgia heat of mid- to late May of … Continue reading

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Greetings from Andersonville Prison

No, I’m not in jail. I spent yesterday at the National Historic Site marking the prison where my great-great-grandfather spent three months as a POW during the Civil War. On June 10, 1864, William Davies was captured at the Battle of Brice’s … Continue reading

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Alpine avalanche in World War I

My grandfather, Attilio Ciliotta, was born in the Italian Alps, near the Austrian border. At the start of World War I, his older brothers applied to join the elite Alpini Corps. Only Mario, the oldest, was accepted. Attilio, at nine … Continue reading

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Andersonville links three generations

My grandfather’s interest in Civil War history was, I expect, heightened by reading his wife’s grandfather’s diary of service in the Union army. I remember reading the titles of history books on the shelves in my grandparents’ apartment in the … Continue reading

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